SAFETY TIPS WHILE DRIVING WITH CHILDREN

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Time to make a citizen’s arrest, Sister, or at least stage an intervention — your brother is absolutely putting his children in danger and is breaking major kids’ car safety rules. Driving with little kids in the front seat just isn’t safe, even if that most precious of cargo is buckled up.

Whenever you’re on the road, make sure children are buckled in age- and size-appropriate car seats, booster seats, or seat belts. Children under age 13 should ride properly buckled in the back seat on every trip. Never place a rear-facing car seat in the front seat or in front of an airbag. Airbags can kill young children riding in the front seat.

Front-seat riders are more at risk in a front-end collision, and, ironically, children can be seriously injured by the very feature that saves adult lives: the airbag. Air bags offer great protection to teens and adults but can endanger smaller, lighter people (little kids, that is) when they inflate. (Babies in rear-facing seats strapped in the front seat face the biggest risk, but everyone under 13 should stay out of the front seat.) Even newer, “advanced” airbags may still not be safe for kids (more research is needed), so why take a chance?

Meanwhile, in a report gathered by premium times, according to the report, 2,478 road accidents occurred in the third quarter of 2017. The report stated that a total of 6,803 Nigerians got injured in the accidents.

It stated that 6,419 of the 6,803 Nigerians that got injured, representing 94.4 per cent of the figure were adults while the remaining 384 Nigerians, representing 5.7 per cent of the figure were children.

Car safety: seatbelts

In Nigeria, it’s illegal to drive or travel in a car without a properly adjusted and fastened seatbelt. It’s also illegal and unsafe to carry your child on your lap in a private car, even if you’re wearing a seatbelt. Also, you should never share a seatbelt with your child or another passenger.

You can set a good example for children by always wearing your own seatbelt. Young children learn most by watching the grown-ups around them.

Start driving only when all seatbelts are done up. Never drive while your child’s restraint straps are undone or twisted. If your child removes straps or undoes buckles, stop the car and do up the straps or buckles again. Explain what you’re doing.

If you need to give your child a reward or incentive for leaving straps or buckles alone, it’s best to use one that will distract your child from the straps and last until you reach your destination.

When travelling with an empty booster seat in the car, fasten the seatbelt around it to prevent the booster seat from injuring someone in the case of a car crash.

You should also restrain any pets travelling with you. You can buy pet harnesses that you can secure with a seatbelt or luggage tie. This protects not only your pet but also any passengers in your car.

Where children should sit in cars

There are minimum legal requirements for where children can sit in motor vehicles:

Children under four years must not travel in the front seat if a car has two or more rows of seats.

If all other seats are being used by children aged less than seven years, children aged between four years and up to seven years may travel in the front seat using an approved forward-facing booster seat and a properly fastened and adjusted seatbelt.

Know the Stages

Make sure children are properly buckled up in a car seat, booster seat, or seat belt, whichever is appropriate for their weight, height, and age.

Use a rear-facing car seat from birth until ages 2–4.

For the best possible protection, infants and toddlers should be buckled in a rear-facing car seat, in the back seat, until they reach the maximum weight and/or height limits of their car seat. Check the seat’s owner’s manual and/or labels on the seat for weight and height limits.

After outgrowing the rear-facing car seat, use a forward-facing car seat until at least age 5.

When children outgrow their rear-facing seats, they should be buckled in a forward-facing car seat, in the back seat, until they reach the upper weight or height limit of their seat. Check the seat’s owner’s manual and/or labels on the seat for weight and height limits.

After outgrowing the forward-facing car seat; use a booster seat and until seat belts fit properly.

Once children outgrow their forward-facing seat, they should be buckled in a belt-positioning booster seat until seat belts fit properly. Seat belts fit properly when the lap belt lays across the upper thighs (not the stomach) and the shoulder belt lies across the chest (not the neck). Proper seat belt fit usually occurs when children are about 4 feet 9 inches tall and ages 9–12 years. Remember to keep children properly buckled in the back seat for the best possible protection.

Once seat belts fit properly without a booster seat, use a seat belt on every trip.

Children no longer need to use a booster seat once seat belts fit them properly. Seat belts fit properly when the lap belt lays across the upper thighs (not the stomach) and the shoulder belt lies across the chest (not the neck). Proper seat belt fit usually occur when children are about 4 feet 9 inches tall and ages 9–12 years. For the best possible protection, keep children properly buckled in the back seat.

You won’t have to worry about all these tips if you hire a driver from Driversng. Our drivers are well trained and have sound knowledge of these safety tips.

We hope this article has helped you to understand more about driving with kids. If you enjoyed this post, kindly like, comment and share with your friends and family who might need this Thank you!

Learn more of this by exploring other articles or you can contact us in case you want us to help you through.

 

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